Day 313: No Dream Left Behind

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November 8, 2012 by Alex Hoekstra

It takes something special for me to go to a theater to see a film.  Most of the time, the only compelling reason has to do with the film itself – something like Avatar or Star Trek (the most recent film), which had astounding special effects that could only be properly experienced on the big screen, with big speakers and sticky floors.  I can’t say that I’ve ever gone to a theater for the sake of the theater itself.  With rare exceptions, theaters are generally the same.  Big screens, big speakers, comfy chairs, sticky floors, overpriced…everything.  Today’s project is about one very rare, very exceptional exception.  Ragtag Cinema sounds like an incredible place to watch just about any film – good, bad, new or old.  It’s been an entertainment landmark (and partial oddity), with a legacy of defying expectations about what a theater can be.  Change, though, often comes only in the face of necessity, and so Ragtag is now forced to evolve, to adapt, in order to survive and continue its mission for extraordinary entertainment.  Digital film is the way of the future…the only way of the future, which for a theater with ambition means one thing: more robots.  That’s why Ragtag is turning to Kickstarter – to help fund a transition to digital projection so that new films can be experienced in their unique way for years to come.  I like their quirk and I hope you’ll help me keep it alive, let it thrive and one day, maybe spread to your town and mine.  Check out Ragtag Cinema and back it before November 10.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1212608058/ragtag-needs-robots

Beginning in January 2013, the distributor of many of Ragtag Cinema’s highest grossing films such as Little Miss Sunshine, Black Swan and Best Exotic Marigold Hotel  will replace 35mm film with the Digital Cinema Package (or DCP) as their exclusive format for the distribution of movies. Other major distributors have indicated they plan to finalize this conversion in the following 6 to 12 months.  This means that, in less than a year, film as we have known it will nearly cease to exist.

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